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female cia officer who tracked down osama bin laden. >> women were pivotal to this kind. women and men. when at the center of this kind. that -- women at the center of this hunt. that was extremely surprising. they have their analysts, and they are in important positions. >> how truthful is your account? i know it is a feature film and not a documentary. are the basic outlines true? >> everything that happens on the screen is representative of firsthand accounts. >> it always had the potential to wimbledon president obama is image as a commanding leader -- embolden president obama's image as a commanding leader. the filmmakers have denied this. it is a film that will help the president. >> i think it does a lot for obama because what it does, it shows that obama has a cool, compost, meticulous commitment to achieve something the democratic presidents are never relied upon to achieve. to fight and eliminate in the news of the united states -- in the knees -- enemies of the united states. >> the most gripping moments are in the last 30 minutes as the audience follows blackhawk helicopter
the decision to close the c.i.a. annex, the c.i.a. operation in benghazi, was made early morning hours of september 12 about eight or nine hours after the first wave of the attacks hit the night before. fox was told the c.i.a. site was sanitized so that all of the classified material, the classified equipment, was either destroyed or removed in a 12-hour window and we asked the lawmakers about this. they have not wanted to discuss it on camera but they are indicating this shows you where a lot of the focus was in those hours after the attack, very much on the annex and c.i.a. operation. >>trace: thank you, catherine, from capitol hill. the sea port strike that cost southern californian estimated $1 billion a day is over. workers at the ports of los angeles and long beach walked off the job a week ago and many cargo ships had to change course or simply line up until the ports re-open. for retailers this could not have come as a worse time because they rely on this sea port for a holiday good like clothing and if unture and electronics. both now have struck a deal. adam is like at the po
in cairo, reza sayah, thank you. >>> in the movie about the bin laden raid, she is the hero. but in the cia, apparently not all roses for this agent. i'm brooke baldwin. the news is now. >>> many americans out of work are bracing for january 1st when benefits stop. >> it is what it is. >> the personal side of the fiscal cliff. >>> and just moments ago, the rock and roll hall of fame just announced its brand-new class. we'll show you what happened. searching for a bank designed for investors like you? tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 schwab bank was built with all the value and convenience tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 investors want. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like no atm fees, worldwide. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and no nuisance fees. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 plus deposit checks with mobile deposit. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and manage your cash and investments tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with schwab's mobile app. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 no wonder schwab bank has grown to over 70 billion in assets. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 so if you're looking for a bank that's in your corner, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 not just on the corner... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550
team of katherine big ga lo and mark bo, recreates how it all happened from the female cia analyst who finally figured out where he was hiding to the navy s.e.a.l.s who killed him. >> there are two narratives about the location of osama bin laden. >> reporter: the controversy? the obama administration has faced accusations it gave undeserved access to the filmmakers. in real life, everyone involved in the hunt for bin laden remains sworn to secrecy. but the filmmakers say they got firsthand accounts. they just won't say exactly how that happened. >> i think as a reporter you would understand we take prot t protecting our sources and sort of the exact methodology of our sourcing pretty seriously, just in the same way if i asked you how did you source that story. >> katherine, when you hear mark talk this way, are you a journalist or a filmmakerer? >> that's a good question. well, i certainly tried to be as faithful to the research as possible and make a good movie and make a film that was timely. >> reporter: but how much access they got is the issue. >> obviously things went wrong her
questions as well. i would point to the issue over the cia talking points and these decisions to make changes that critics say really minimize the role of al qaeda and affiliated groups in this attack, martha. martha: certainly got the right people in the room to answer a lot of those questions. we'll see if they get anywhere conclusive today. you know one of the big issues that has been raised by all of this of course, catherine, is our intelligence on the ground in benghazi. what are we learning about the future of that annex and our presence there? >> reporter: fox news has learned that the decision to close the cia annex and to destroy all of the classified information and move out the classified communications equipment came within 12 hours, 12 hours of the at dark -- attack on the consulate itself and early morning september 12th, by 8:00 local time, effectively the cia operation in benghazi was shuttered. all the classified information was moved or burned as well as the equipment and this was a decision fox was told was made on the ground. then there was notification to washing
of the homeland security committee and said that he wanted an investigation from the cia and the department of defense to find out whether you guys were given classified information in the researching for this movie. and a lot of people were very concerned about that. so let's ask. did you get classified information from the administration in preparing for this movie? >> no. i mean, we did a lot of homework as i hope is evidenced on the screen when you see the movie. and i hope people go see the movie and judge for themselves. but it's an election year and people say things in that process. and now that we have a movie that is actually going to be in theaters soon, i think people will see we didn't come with any agenda at all. >> i think one of the things they're going to be surprised at one of the center characters, perhaps the person most responsible for finding where he was hiding was a woman, the character you play, mya. what did you think of her? >> well, when i first read the script, i was shocked that a woman played a central role in it and then i was upset at myself that i was so sh
was interviewed by the cia when he left syria. now, he's pleading for the u.s. to give him money and weapons so that he can lead a brigade of fighters back into syria and secure those sites. diane? >> thank you so much, alex. >>> now, we want to tell you the late news about a record fine against a prominent bank, after a startling series of charges. the british banking giant hsbc, about to pay big time. after allegations of money laundering, linked to iran and mexican drug cartels. "the new york times" reports a record settlement. $1.9 billion to be announced tomorrow. >>> and now, a storm blasting the upper midwest of the united states. what a difference a week makes. it was a mild 62 degrees in minneapolis last week, and now a massive storm has dumped nearly 16 inches in the twin cities. more snow in one day than they expect in a month. it was a slippery, sliding mess on the roads. hundreds of snow-related car wrecks across both minnesota and wisconsin. >>> and now, the news of the shocking death of a rising star in latin america, just about to receive her dream of taking on north american tv
to mexico. >>> now for the complicated life of a cia official who tracked down osama bin laden. there's a reported backlash. according to the washington post the undercover operative who tracked osama bin laden has been passed over for a promotion. the newspaper reports that she sent e-mails to colleagues saying they didn't deserve to share any credit and she is being investigated for her contact with the film makers. >>> from the battle inside the cia to the seemingly never ending battle over obesity. after 30 years of children getting fatter obesity rates are starting to go down. big cities like new york and nebraska reported small drops in childhood obesity rates. that is according to the robert wood johnson foundation. experts say it is the first sign that childhood obesity can be reversing. the 2012 america's health rankings find americans are living longer thanks to medical is hoping a multi-year deal with beyonce estimated to be worth $50 million, you could buy a lot of baby cloefts, her face will be found on limited edition pepsi cans starting early next year. is it just me or
territories even though obviously the military and the cia and pentagon could play a role. what happens on a daily basis from this kind of an empire is that and actually does. states remain sovereign. and so this raises the question, the development of a phrase of the international edition of other states. how did other states count to take responsibility for global capitalism with in their own territory. on the one hand, through sovereign states rather than taking them over, and on the other hand most of the way this operates is through what looks like it's a voluntary because its markets and institutions, free trade. everyone signs on. so it's a very different kind of empire. >> i'm wondering if we can go back to still little bit and think all little bed. you made some distinctions between industrial of capital and finance capital. i would think -- like to think about how that works nationally and internationally and think about how coherent this is and how to influence the state. >> radical political economist have made a lot of this distinction between industrial and financial. and
was interviewed by the cia when he left syria. now he's pleading for money and weapons from the u.s. so he can lead a brigade of fighters back into syria to secure those sites. alex marquardt, abc news, on the turkey-syria border. >> the major general gave an interview back in september. so several weeks back and says during his time there, we were in a serious discussion about the use of chemical weapons, including how we would use them and in what areas. we discussed this as a last resort. such as if the regime lost control of important areas such as aleppo. so not that we have them, but details have been discussed. >> he's the second in charge. he says that assad's forces are already spraying pesticides and dropping white phosphorous. claims that were also made by the opposition. but the reason the whole world should be concerned about this is because if it gets into the wrong hands, these chemical weapons are so easily transportable. you're thinking hezbollah could get them in their hands and anybody that's friendly with syria at this point. so that is why -- >> again, if you're wondering
the legacy of all of the bureaucrat particular power. >> former cia official says in recent month kim has purging 200 top officials, including powerful generals who had been loyal to his father. >> generals that are being elevated indeed are a bit more hardcore, hardlined than the generals that were originally in place. so if anything it's an indication that north korea is not going to be any more reform-minded under kim jong-unthan his spread says fors. >> in fact, he's a hardliner who got his fingerprints on the 2010 warship by north korea and the shelling of a disputedisland which killed four south koreans, wolf. he's kwn as a pretty bellicose general. >> people are worried about it right now. let's say they develop a missile with a warhead potentially capable of reaching the united states. what are the u.s. capabilities in terms of defending itself against such a missile? >> leon panetta said that the u.s. is very confident if north korea were to launch a missile at the united states, the american military could guard against it. that's a major reason why they are bolstering their pre
, secretary of state, secretary of defense, cia director. he wants to unveil it all at the same time, a new national security team. >> thank you, jake. >>> now to the second straight sunday, tragedy overshadowing an nfl game. the dallas cowboys taking the field with heavy hearts the day after player died in a horrific car crash caused by his teammate driving drunk. john schriffen has the story. >> reporter: a silent josh brent walked out of jail. he's charged with intoxication manslaughter in the death of his dallas cowboys teammate and roommate, jerry brown jr. >> he said my best friend died. you can't get tirgt than those two. >> reporter: the car they were in hit a curb, flipped and kaugtd fire, killing brown. brent admitted to drinking at a club that evening and smelled of alcohol. an emotion gnat cowboys team beat the cincinnati bengals. teammates holing up brown's jersey after the game. >> football is very different than life. we lost a 25-year-old young man who had his whole life in front of him. >> reporter: his death is the second in the nfl in as many weeks. on december 1st, polic
of terrorist ties. phillip mudd, a former cia and fbi counterterrorism official, says there's a huge concern over who to trust with chemical weapons. >> when you've got roughly 10% of the opposition in the. >>>s u.s. government is declaring are terrorist group you're going to be concerned. in any case like this, there's a lot of risk. >> reporter: but mudd says it's still better to train the rebels on how to handle those materials than to do nothing. and leonard specter says the u.s. and its allies are likely screening the individuals who are being trained very carefully, wofrl, at least that's the hope. >> despite all that, there's still a potential for these chemical weapons getting into the wrong hands. despite what the u.s. is trying to do. >> reporter: phillip mudd says if the syrian regime loses control of these weapons, that's a huge worry. if they fall into the hands of others who are not trusted by the u.s. or its allies they could float around the border to iraq or other potentially dangerous places where they don't have control over these things. if assad loses control of these th
of the cia instead. and get this. the reason why he said -- this was a 90-minute conversation he had with fox news national security analyst, kathleen mcfarland who went on ailes' behest to pitch this. petraeus said at the time my wife would divorce me if i decided to run. i love my wife. we have a beautiful house with his and hers bathrooms, believe it or not. i just want to live in it. i've never spent a night in it. >> he was doing other things, i guess. >>> it's also raising an interesting debate. should the head of a news organization be actively involved in recruiting candidates for president? obviously, you know, in this day and age, we know which network leans left, which network leans right. should you be that actively involved to say i will quit to run someone's campaign? it raises an interesting debate and media circles, i think, as well. >> rogers ailes denies this, saying the strategist that went on his behalf to pitch this. that sonny was way out of line. and zero chance he would leave fox. the money was too good. that's what we say about our jobs. >> yes, that's exactly what we
experience in the cia, how would you approach even solving this mystery in front of us right now? >> i mean, it has to come from intelligence. i doubt that the fbi, as good of work as they really do, are going to get the answers they need talking to libyan witnesses. this has to come through clandestine sources, technical means that'll allow us to pinpoint who did this. you're going to be listening to intercepts and things along this line which will allow you to act. i don't want to act against people who are not responsible for this, but i think after three months considering we have the world's best intelligence agencies and investigators, it's troubling to me, i'm disappointed that we haven't been able to bring these people to justice. and like i said, this is sending a terrible signal to folks around the world. and, you know, rick just mentioned mali. that's a place that's becoming an al-qaeda state. jenna: and youty they're -- do you think there's a connection there? why? >> it's a result of what happened in libya, because after the revolution was over in the libya, the arab spring upr
doctor who was a c.i.a. informant and helped us hunt down osama bin laden? he's reportedly been tortured in a pakinstani prison, according to his brother. back in june, the doctor was sentenced to 33 years behind bars for conspiring against pakistan. now six months into his sentence, is the united states doing enough to secure his release? let's talk to fox news legal analyst, peter johnson, jr. >> he's being left for dead. >> steve: he is? >> he's an honorary american. 3,000 lives, more, on september 11. >> steve: he's being tortured. >> he tried to get bin laden and infiltrated through a dna ruse, hepatitis vaccine. now he's been tortured, burned with cigarettes, according to reports. he's been shocked. he was blindfolded for a year. he had his hands tied behind his back for a year. the state department says we're trying to get him out. we're trying to negotiate a release. there was a bill the defense authorization act of 2013 trying to limit the $800 million going to counter insurgency funds in pakistan and saying, listen, the department of defense has to sign off that they're doing e
, last night, a former cia officer, robert bear, was speaking to anderson cooper. he described what the use of sarin could do. here's more of what he had to say. >> one round and the dispersion on that could be -- depends on the wind -- but you could take out, let's say a city like homs, you could take out a third of the city in the first couple of hours. anderson, this is a highly toxic liquid. it's a persistent agent. it's absolutely completely deadly. >> reporter: now, we've heard repeatedly from u.s. administration officials, u.s. president barack obama, u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton that the use of chemical weapons in syria was a red line for which syria and the bashar al assad regime would face severe consequences if they ever did cross that red line and utilize chemical weapons against the people of syria. >> and we have no idea what those severe consequences would be, right? >> reporter: that's right, we don't. you know, people speculate that this would mean some type of military intervention, but we also know that a lot of world powers have not wanted to intervene
's keeping his own council abthat. he's alleges got the cia slot to fill as well. there are rumors there may be changes on his national security team. but nobody is being very specific about it at this point. >> shira, just the optics of the gop engaged in -- in a days-long filibuster with regards to susan rice, attacking susan rice for days. is that a fight that they want to pick? >> you'd think they wouldn't want to pick this fight, especially when there are other well-qualified people who want to be secretary of state such as john kerry, the senator of massachusetts, has made no secret at all that this is a position he's wanted far really long time. so you think this would not be a battle the white house would pick. but obviously the president has a lot of loyalty to susan rice. his defense of her a couple weeks ago from the podium was really unique and frankly defensive. so if this is who he wants, he has every right to nominate her and the senate has every right to say no. >> david, before i let you guys get out of here, i had katon dawson on a few minutes ago. saturdays we like to enga
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)